I Speak Gelato.

Just call me
Maria von Trapp.

new job

ah, i have so much to learn, stuff that is easy enough in america, but iver here i don’t know where anything is, and …. it’s all in german. ulm is very pretty though

don’t know how long i’ll last

staying awake that is. this will be brief but will be continued when i have more strength to type. 25 hours of travel, and i am not thinking straight. at the schafers house and i showered, karen their au pair is still here for one week (which is good because then she can show me the ropes) so i’m in the guest room for now. just showered, and going to meet the kids soon! definitely going to sleep long and well tonight….

i don’t remember what else i was going to say

blacksburg

last night in the town i grew up in. all moved out of the apt, and sleeping upstairs with bear. breakfast with mary tomorrow at gillies and then back to richmond to get everything together before i leave bright and early wednesday morning. (and then hangout in jfk for 9 hours, oh joy, haha) 

it is all an adventure, that now, i suppose i have to embark on, on my own. (although can’t wait for LT to join me in Ulm in 2 months!) 

lovelove

the bible belt

yesterday on the drive to roanoke through the back county there were three separate and unique baptist church signs:

1. google doesn’t have all the answers

2. school’s out but church is in

(and my personal favorite)

3. our lifeguard walks on water

which church should i attend this sunday to pray for safe passage to germany? 

archaeology:


The menorah, originally painted a rich yellow, on the Arch of Titus in the Roman Forum.
Technology Identifies Lost Color at Roman Forum
Historical sources describe the menorah looted by the Romans when they destroyed the Second Temple in Jerusalem in A.D. 70 as made of gold, as God instructed Moses in Exodus.
So the recent discovery that a version of the menorah in a bas-relief on the first-century Arch of Titus in the Roman Forum was originally painted a rich yellow should not come as much of a surprise. But given that the image faded to the color of its underlying stone long ago — like so much else in and around the Forum — precise knowledge of its once-bright pigmentation comes as an exciting revelation to historians and archaeologists.
“The Bible said it was gold, but the monument, as it was seen for centuries, told us it was white,” said Steven Fine, the director of the Arch of Titus Digital Restoration Project and a professor of Jewish history at Yeshiva University in New York, which is sponsoring the project. “Isn’t it cool to be that much closer to the viewers of the first and second century?”
The findings were made possible using noninvasive spectrometry readings carried out on the arch this month.
“The advantage of this method is that it doesn’t harm the monument,” said Cinzia Conti, the state archaeologist responsible for the arch. The monument is not only an important part of Rome’s physical history but also “very significant for the Jewish community,” she said.

More here.

archaeology:

The menorah, originally painted a rich yellow, on the Arch of Titus in the Roman Forum.

Technology Identifies Lost Color at Roman Forum

Historical sources describe the menorah looted by the Romans when they destroyed the Second Temple in Jerusalem in A.D. 70 as made of gold, as God instructed Moses in Exodus.

So the recent discovery that a version of the menorah in a bas-relief on the first-century Arch of Titus in the Roman Forum was originally painted a rich yellow should not come as much of a surprise. But given that the image faded to the color of its underlying stone long ago — like so much else in and around the Forum — precise knowledge of its once-bright pigmentation comes as an exciting revelation to historians and archaeologists.

“The Bible said it was gold, but the monument, as it was seen for centuries, told us it was white,” said Steven Fine, the director of the Arch of Titus Digital Restoration Project and a professor of Jewish history at Yeshiva University in New York, which is sponsoring the project. “Isn’t it cool to be that much closer to the viewers of the first and second century?”

The findings were made possible using noninvasive spectrometry readings carried out on the arch this month.

“The advantage of this method is that it doesn’t harm the monument,” said Cinzia Conti, the state archaeologist responsible for the arch. The monument is not only an important part of Rome’s physical history but also “very significant for the Jewish community,” she said.

More here.

lostsplendor:

Hitler Pin Cushion, c. 1941 (via Retronaut)

“It’s good luck to find a pin. Here’s an Axis to stick it in!” -The Stick a Pin in Hitler Club, Chicago IL.

(via lostsplendor)

less than 2 weeks

so close! i can’t believe it! it will be nice to finally get there so that my nightly dream of forgetting some very important part of my luggage at the airport stops 

In his blue gardens men and girls came and went like moths among the whisperings and the champagne and the stars.

—F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby (via lostsplendor)